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101 Copy of a letter from Mr. Thomas Tannahill (1762-1854) in Paisley to his relations in America. Thomas was writing to his aunts in USA - widows of uncles John and Robert who had emigrated in 1774.
Dated Paisley, 19th, May, 1824
Dear Aunts:
Your nephews on this side of the water are longing to hear from you. We would take it very kindly if you would correspond with us and let us know the situation of your families. Although our fathers are no more, we would not wish you to forget us their children. We will not trouble you with anything belonging to this country- but what we think will be more interesting to you, some particulars respecting our own families.
I am the only one of your nephews here that recollects our uncles. I assisted one or other of them at times as a draw boy. I have Uncle John's lamp which our father kept as long as he lived, it has stood in the same place, since our uncle went away which is about fifty years ago.
Our father died about two years ago aged near eighty seven years. He left two sons, two daughters with their families, with brother Robert's widow and family. Robert died about six years ago. Our uncle James died many years since. Our father and uncle James lived on the greatest friendship, they were respected by all who knew them while they lived, and were regretted when they died. I hope it was so with our uncles Robert and John. I remember they were like one another for the amiableness of their temper, and we are happy to say that our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were noted for their piety; which I hope will be said of their children for many generations.
The last account we heard of you was from Mr. Samuel Purden who came over about the end of the war. He informed us of the welfare of your families. He gave us some hopes that some of your sons would pay us a visit, which we would be very glad to realize.
With respect to my family I have three sons one of who is married in Glasgow very comfortable, has five children. Another is married in this town -has two children. Our youngest is at home with us. My wife and myself are on the decline of live, we cannot wait here.
You will see by our packet of letters how kindly we would take it if any of your would correspond with us. I will add no more but hope this will come safe to hand. I remain your loving nephew.
(signed) Thomas Tannahill 
TANNAHILL, Thomas (I2979)
 
102 Copy of a letter from Mr. Thomas Tannahill, in Paisley to his relations in America Dated Paisley, 19th, May, 1824 Dear Aunts: Your nephews on this side of the water are longing to hear from you. We would take it very kindly if you would correspond with us and let us know the situation of your families. Although our fathers are no more, we would not wish you to forget us their children. We will not trouble you with anything belonging to this country- but what we think will be more interesting to you, some particulars respecting our own families. I am the only one of your nephews here that recollects our uncles. I assisted one or other of them at times as a draw boy. I have Uncle John's lamp which our father kept as long as he lived, it has stood in the same place, since our uncle went away which is about fifty years ago. Our father died about two years ago aged near eighty seven years. He left two sons, two daughters with their families, with brother Robert's widow and family. Robert died about six years ago. Our uncle James died many years since. Our father and uncle James lived on the greatest friendship, they were respected by all who knew them while they lived, and were regretted when they died. I hope it was so with our uncles Robert and John. I remember they were like one another for the amiableness of their temper, and we are happy to say that our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were noted for their piety; which I hope will be said of their children for many generations. The last account we heard of you was from Mr. Samuel Purden who came over about the end of the war. He informed us of the welfare of your families. He gave us some hopes that some of your sons would pay us a visit, which we would be very glad to realize. With respect to my family I have three sons one of who is married in Glasgow very comfortable, has five children. Another is married in this town -has two children. Our youngest is at home with us. My wife and myself are on the decline of live, we cannot wait here. You will see by our packet of letters how kindly we would take it if any of your would correspond with us. I will add no more but hope this will come safe to hand. I remain your loving nephew. (signed) Thomas Tannahill Family F906
 
103 Copy of letter from Mr. James Tannahill (1771-1843) in Paisley to his relations in America. Transcribed by Carmen Johnson.
James, the third son, was named after his father. The fourth son was Robert, the Paisley Poet who had died in 1810.

Dated Paisley, N. Britain
5th, April 1824
Respected, but unknown friends: The name Tannahill was so rare in Paisley when I was born, that from my earliest recollection I thought it an odd and singular name. There were not any in the town of that name save my father and my uncle Thomas and their families. I was yet very young when I began to take notice of its uncommonness. I noticed when boys were calling over each other's names in the course of their youthful games that Tannahill was often repeated with a sort of muttering as if it sounded strange in their mouths. It was a very common thing in those days for boys to invent nicknames for one another and in many cases that nickname was an alteration or an addition to their proper name. My name being so rare in the place I had my known share of this sort of nickname, namely a play on Tannahill. On this account in course of time I began to feel ashamed to tell it, when it happened I was asked it by a stranger. I was perhaps twenty years of age before this feeling left me.

Previous to about sixty years, the name Tannahill was unknown in Paisley. About that time four brothers, James, Thomas, Robert, and John Tannahill for the sake of their business removed from Kilmarnock to Paisley, a distance of about 22 or 24 miles. In course of time the two elder brothers James and Thomas married and settled in Paisley.

A few years after their marriage the property of the British American attracted a particular attention and from reports of the easiness of making a fortune there and enjoying all the comforts of life many people migrated from this part of the country to America in the hope of bettering their circumstances. Such accounts as these could not fail to draw the attention of the four brothers. At this time I was too young to know anything about it, but I understand it was resolved that the two younger brothers Robert and John being unmarried should go out first and pave the way for the two elder brothers following with their families.

I cannot say that I have any distinct recollection of my uncles Robert and John. At most it is so faint that the recollection of them is but a dream. At the time they went away I could not have been more than three years of age. Anything at that age makes but a faint impression. Still the remembrance of them is one of my earliest impressions. This might arise from having heard of them often spoken of, not only in my father's family, but by members of their old acquaintances who associated with them before they left the country. I am now sensible that when I was very young I got rather proud of my uncles who were in America, because every one spoke of them with respect as being honorable, clever and ingenious men.

Several instances of their ingenuity, are yet in my recollection, particularly a time-piece left with my father which my uncle Robert made with his pen-knife. Some few years before they went to America the weaving business came to be almost the sole trade in Paisley and being in an improving and progressive state, the trade of Paisley resolved to give to the world some expression of their respect for their business, and of their loyalty to their King and Country. Accordingly a weavers procession or parade was chosen to take place on the 4th of June, the birthday of George III. This was to be done with as great show and splendor as possible. Among other parts of ornament proposed was cockade to be worn on the caps of those who joined in the procession. Accordingly the whole town was invited to exert their ingenuity in planning he most appropriate and most elegant cockade. Many specimens were given in for the approbation of the public. But the one planned and executed by my uncle Robert, was the one that pleased best and was adopted, and so long at the parades were kept up in Paisley, this cockade was the universal badge, and though time changes almost every custom, and our parades have been for many years done away, still there are some of these cockades to be found in possession of some people in the town who preserve them as a remembrance of their once loved parade, and of their old acquaintance Robert Tannahill.

Whether my father or my uncle had any serious intention of going to America I cannot say, but by the time I could join in deliberation on such a subject, it ceased to be one in my father's family. But so long as I live the impression made on my young fancy of going to America to see my uncles, will never be eradicated. This must have been caused by conversations on the subject which I frequently heard when I could not take a part in them. It is probable that the war that took place between Britain and the Colonies helped to put a stop to their going to America. Still they felt a brotherly interest for their relations in America and a correspondence by letter was kept up by the brothers which served to promote a feeling of kindness and relationship so long as they lived this feeling (though so far separated) is not yet extinguished in the breasts of their children here, and often when the brothers and cousins meet they talk of the relations they have in America of the name of Tannahill.

Whether it was owing to the singularity of the name of Tannahill, I do not know, but I always felt nearer of kin to a relative of that name than to a relation of the same degree, who was of another name. Although there were originally only four brothers of that name in Paisley and two of them left it, now there are a great many of that name in it, all spring from my father James and my uncle Thomas.

Although a number of their children are dead, and some removed to other places there are perhaps not less than fifty of the name in Paisley. Of six sons and one daughter which my father had, who all came to maturity, there are only my brother Matthew and I who are alive. Two of our brothers, Thomas and Robert died without being married. Our sister, and brothers Hugh and Andrew all married and left children. I have three sons and six daughters all unmarried, my brother Matthew is married and has seven children.

The two families of James and Thomas always lived in the most friendly and agreeable terms. The cousins when they met were like brothers. But there are few of us now, and we are getting up in years. When we chance to meet we frequently talk of our cousins in America, whom we have never seen. We are informed that both of our uncles left families and we often wish that we were somewhat acquainted with them, though but by letter. Not long ago while we were met in a friendly and social way, speaking our friends in American, we thought it a pity that such near relations should be unknown to one another. Three of us agreed to write each a letter to our friends in America and send them all out at the same time, soliciting a correspondence in return with an account of what sons and daughters were alive of our uncles, Robert and John, with any particulars concerning them which they might be pleased to communicate. Should this be complied with we shall be very happy in the correspondence and shall not fail to write you in return and answer any enquiry that may be made with regard to the name of Tannahill.
Yours Respectfully (Signed) James Tannahill

(James has nine children: three sons and six daughters. None of James' children are married) 
TANNAHILL, James (I2968)
 
104 Could be 1851 but age on gravestone would be wrong then. MARSDEN, Esther (I1695)
 
105 Could he come from
Portadown Armagh, Ireland - Rick Kern's tree 
MAGINNES, Bernard (I2062)
 
106 could this be sister of Jane Bellis (John Maginness' grandmother? Family F641
 
107 Created by: Katie Lou
Record added: Sep 27, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 30123140 
Source (S970)
 
108 Date is of baptism. ROBERTSON, Hugh Hough (I2362)
 
109 Date of birth comes from Blandford Cemetery; death record in Virginia, given by Family Search, says birth 1869 New York TANNAHILL, Edward (I5545)
 
110 Date: 26 March 1846 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Admitted this day from Entwisle. 30 years of age. Married and has 5 children. Handloom weaver. Can read imperfectly. Church of England religion. Temperament problematic. Duration 6 months. First attack. Frame good. Has a strumous look.(my note:possibly means abnormal swelling of the thyroid gland).Has frequently a falling down of the womb. Head small. Low forehead. Mental condition: restless impatient. Senses: eyes irritable to light. Visage: cheerful. Chest: natural............. Appetite good. Sleeps well, dreams much. Catamenia have appeared since admission. Has been twice to the Bolton Workhouse during the last six months.
Date: 19 June 1846 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: No decided amendment since admission. Not disposed to talk often. Complains of being separated from the family. Supposes that everything she does is right. Is kept occupied in the laundry.
Date: 29 July 1846 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Has lately been worse in mind since seeing her husband. Was agitated and talkative for 3 or 4 days. Is now settled but converses very strangely at times. The catamenia have been absent for some time.'
Date: 29 December 1846 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Has lately had an attack of excitement when she was flushed and talkative. Took purges. Is at present quiet.'
Date: 20 January 1847 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Calomel quii...' (my note: A colorless, white or brown tasteless compound, Hg2Cl2, used as a purgative and insecticide. Also called mercurous chloride.)
Date: 23 March 1847 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Calomel/opium ... at night.'
Date: 16 April 1847 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Dilution of morpine ...'
Date: 23 November 1847 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Has frequent attacks of excitement when she talks much. The face flushes and the eyes glisten. Takes morphine at the night ?porter? and exercises out of doors.'
Date: 12 August 1848 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'The attacks of excitement have been more frequent of late, continuing for several days when she required seclusion. Takes morphine when needed, also malt liquor. During the intervals is quiet and willing to assist in sewing.'
Date: 31 October 1850 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'The paroxysms of excitement have continued to be frequent averaging in a month or 6 weeks at which time she requires seclusion being noisy and violent. It has been noticed that these attacks coincide more or less regularly with her menstrual periods. Is at all times flighty in conversation and almost immediately becoming incoherent.. Often talks about her family. Has delusions, rather ill-defined. Is in tolerable good health. Is useful in assisting in the Gallery but at all times irritable and liable to sudden impulses of violence from slight causes.'
Date: 11 January 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: Again noisy and much excited, requiring seclusion. Has taken Tr Hyoseya... 3i (my note: possibly Hyoscyamus niger) three times a day with advantage.'
Date: 15 February 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: Whilst excited broke several panes of glass. Attacks of excitement more frequent of late.'
Date: 22 February 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Upon the whole improved. Is taking iron in combination with H........'(?)
Census Date: 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum, Lancaster, Lancashire Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire
Note: In 1851 Ann was not at home at the time of the census. There was, however, an Ann Entwistle who was a patient at the District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster. This Ann was 34, married, a hand loom weaver, born in Bolton, Lancashire
Date: 16 August 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Attacks of excitement are frequent when she is in seclusion takes henbane.' (my note: What It Is; Why It Works Henbane contains hyoscyamine, the active ingredient in certain prescription drugs for spasms and cramps, including Cytospaz and Urised. Henbane fights cramps by relaxing the smooth muscles that line the internal organs, especially those in the digestive tract. It also relieves muscle tremors and has a calming effect. Henbane has been known for its wine-like sedative properties since the time of the ancient Greeks. Mentioned by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Gower, and Spenser, it is also one of the best known herbs in English literature.)
Date: 20 December 1851 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14 Note: 'Is slowly recovering. Has not regained her usual looks.' Date: 14 February 1852 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Again excited, in seclusion, loud in conversation.' Date: 1 May 1852 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (now Standen Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'Has had another attack of excitement, face also swelled from toothache. Is now better again.' Date: 6 July 1852 Place: District County Lunatic Asylum at Lancaster Address: Lancaster Moor Hospital (nowStanden Park), Lancaster, Lancashire Source: [S153] Case book HRL/1/14
Note: 'No improvement. Removed by her husband by permission of magistrates but in opposition to the opinion of the Superintendant.' 
MARSDEN, Ann (I1674)
 
111 David Oliver comes from a small town in northern England called Houghton-le-Spring, but has lived in Leatherhead, Surrey for the past 14 years.

Straight from college, David went to work as a piano player aboard the QE2 and has travelled widely throughout the world as a working musician, including time living & working as a session musician in Sydney, Australia. Now based in Leatherhead since 1992, David has worked as an independent writer and composer for over a decade.

David specialises in writing for children – both for live and TV, including Children’s BBC series ‘50/50’, and has also written for CBBC’s ‘Fully Booked’ recently shown on Sunday mornings children’s TV. For anyone who’s an early riser, David is also responsible for the theme music and songs for the childrens programme ‘Mole in The Hole’ which can be seen occassionally on GMTV very early on Saturday mornings, which features Geoffrey Hayes and the voices from ‘Rainbow’.

Though most of his time is now spent in front of his mac computer, as a performer David plays piano, electric piano, synths, organ and harpsichord, as well as some flute & sax. He also enjoys trying to sing tenor, but knows it sounds terrible. 
Oliver, David (I3392)
 
112 Death recorded at Blandford Cemetery as 23 Mar 1873 but Virginia Deaths and Burials on FamilySearch says 6 Apr 1872 TANNAHILL, Edward (I5545)
 
113 Death Residence Localities ZIP Code: 08037 Localities: Ancora, Atlantic, New Jersey Batsto, Atlantic, New Jersey Hammonton, Atlantic, New Jersey Sweetwater, Atlantic, New Jersey Probably him. SHAW, George (I3091)
 
114 Derek Smith emailed Brian 9 May 2010 re his grandmother Isobel (Haworth) Nuttal who died 1988. Promises photos etc . HAWORTH, Isobel (I2027)
 
115 Described as 'farmer' on marriage certificate.  
116 Described as widow, abode: workhouse. Age 54. Papist. TANNY, Mary (I2250)
 
117 diarroehia/ exhaustion ROBERTSON, Ada (I2625)
 
118 did he emigrate? ENTWISTLE, Joseph Edmund (I1403)
 
119 Did he exist? Named Charles Walton on daughter's marriage certificate.Could he be pseudonym for Charles Fossett (b. 1806)? WALTON, William? (I6803)
 
120 Died 8 March 1887(Charlotte died 20 February) at 56 Brunswick Road, Upper Holloway aged 21 days. Son of Mrs Charlotte Robertson of independent means (James Hollingham is inserted above Charlotte's name. Charlotte had died on 20 February). Witness was Ellen Philp, aunt, of 18 Hargrave Road, Islington - ie Charlotte's sister Ellen or Helen Smith. Robertson, James Hollingham (I6429)
 
121 Died of tertiary syphilis (6 months). Informant H Poole. ROBERTSON, Charlotte (I2660)
 
122 Double pneumonia complicated by alcoholism  Reid, Robert (I5232)
 
123 e-mail from Charles Nicol mentions staying on Fred's farm in Inverary. TANNAHILL, Fred (I5511)
 
124 Earnsdale Farm and yard today http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=89d95b68-10a1-4ddd-ac66-7131d295c61d&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114348 The Trial of William Garner - Death of a Farmer's Wife 1887 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=6cafe83b-ef41-4628-a8ae-3562bcf03e9e&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114348 JACKSON, Margaret (I2136)
 
125 Either Herbert or John was station master at Cleehills, Ludlow and had a daughter, Daisy JONES, Thomas Herbert (I1272)
 
126 Elizabeth Jones was the informant. Arneil, Jane (I6258)
 
127 Elizabeth Jones was the informant. Hough, Mary Ann (I6079)
 
128 ELIZABETH MITCHELL URE (1882 - 1898)

Elizabeth Mitchell Ure was our great grandfather’s youngest daughter. She was born on 28 July 1882, the lastborn child of her parents Thomas Ure and Mary Jane Tannahill Ure (nee Robertson). She had four brothers and two sisters. There was a five year gap between her and her youngest brother, James, who eventually settled in the U.S.A. We don’t know where her name Elizabeth Mitchell came from, but we do know that her brother, John Tannahill (born in 1867) named his firstborn daughter after her in 1905.

Elizabeth Mitchell, her mother and all but her eldest brother Thomas (born in 1866) were living in Kirkdale at 27 Woodbine Street when her father Thomas (born in 1835) died through drowning in Australia in May 1891 Her mother died a few months later in November and Elizabeth was left as an orphan at only nine years old. At that time she was a pupil at Daisy Street Board School, in the next street to Woodbine Street, where she had been admitted in May 1890 when she would have been seven years old.

After the death of her mother Elizabeth Mitchell continued to attend Daisy Street School but went to live at 111 Walton Breck Road in Anfield. There she joined her eldest brother Thomas and his wife Margaret who were both 28 years old, and their daughter Maggie (born 19 August 1890) and son Andrew (born in 1891 and killed in 1917 in the First World War and buried in Belgium at Tyne Cot cemetery). Thomas was a housepainter and perhaps Elizabeth was a help with the two young babies. While Elizabeth was with them their third child Thomas was born on Christmas Day 1892. She was still attending school and sat her Standard IV examination at Daisy Street in April 1893.

But after two years with her brother’s family the situation must have changed for some reason, because in June 1893 Thomas applied to the Liverpool Seaman’s Orphan Institution for Elizabeth to be admitted. We can only think that this was a last resort. Was it all too much for Thomas’s wife to care for her young sister-in-law as well as her own three very young children? Or was some illness putting extra pressure on the family? Or was it difficult to feed an extra person?

It seems that Thomas was her only married brother or sister. John Tannahill, her second eldest brother, did not marry until 1902. He and Andrew (born in 1870), the third brother, were both going to sea. Where else was she to go?

I have had permission to see the application form which Thomas had to submit to the Orphanage. It is in the Orphanage archives held at the Merseyside Maritime Museum. It shows that Thomas had to produce Elizabeth’s birth certificate, their parents’ marriage certificate, list her brothers and sisters and their ages and give reasons for her admission. He also had to give the name and owners of the ship from which their father drowned and he stated that his father, Thomas Ure senior, had sailed from the port of Liverpool for 35 years prior to his drowning. Elizabeth was examined by the orphanage medical officer, and Thomas had to sign that she had been vaccinated against smallpox, had never had fits and was “free from troublesome habits during the night.” The application was supported by Allen Bros and Co. who were shipowners and trustees of the orphanage.

After two months the application for admission was approved and in August 1893 Elizabeth left her brother’s family in Walton Breck Road and her old school for a new life at the orphanage in Newsham Park.

The orphanage had been opened in 1869 in temporary accommodation in Duke Street, but in1874 imposing new purpose-built accommodation in Newsham Park, looking out across the lake, was officially opened. It is a fine Victorian building in a desirable parkland setting. It is now empty and becoming increasingly derelict while some new use is found for it: there is talk of conversion to luxury apartments. When Elizabeth was resident there in the 1890s there were over 300 children and a further 500 were receiving “outdoor relief” from the charity.

Queen Victoria visited the orphanage in 1886 and granted it Royal Patronage. It was the Queen’s last visit to Liverpool, and she signed the visitors’ book. But the title “Royal” was not bestowed on the Orphanage until 1921, by King George V. The orphanage closed in 1949 due to the requirements of the 1944 Education Act, but the charity still exists in Liverpool and continues to support the children of deceased British merchant seamen.

We know from family stories that Elizabeth was not abandoned by her family because they used to visit her. One family tradition is that John Tannahill was visiting his young sister at the orphanage and met his future wife there, Mary Eliza Catterall. Records show that Mary was certainly never a resident at the orphanage, and it is possible that she may have been a staff member.

Elizabeth would have received domestic training at the orphanage, prior to being placed in domestic service on leaving. But tragically, she suffered two attacks of typhoid fever and died at the Orphanage aged only 15 on 15 May 1898. She was not buried in the family grave in Longmoor Lane Fazakerly, but in Anfield cemetery. 
URE, Elizabeth Mitchell (I3920)
 
129 Ellen possessed a will with a coat of arms on it (Nelson family?). This will had money left to her father (John). He was unable to draw on it because of a legal technicality. MAGINNES, Ellen (I2053)
 
130 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4324)
 
131 Entwisle Family Picnic http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=80a350f0-00e8-4b7a-babc-9392ce7085e3&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114483 GARNER, Thomas (I682)
 
132 Entwistle family, Higher Wood Farm orchard, Darwen- 1907 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d9be880a-01fa-4d9e-9cbb-28b19240e9d5&tid=4166381&pid=-1644113219 ENTWISLE, William (I922)
 
133 Entwistle family, Higher Wood Farm orchard, Darwen- 1907 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d9be880a-01fa-4d9e-9cbb-28b19240e9d5&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114280 GARNER, Margaret (I135)
 
134 Entwistle children at th' Hagg Farm http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=4fa8140f-d364-469b-a81b-d4cb3e2653b2&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114605 ENTWISTLE, Frank (I565)
 
135 Esther Hannah Garner aged 20 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d2f6ef3d-2348-4324-9abd-eac86daf157f&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114441 Entwistle family, Higher Wood Farm orchard, Darwen- 1907 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d9be880a-01fa-4d9e-9cbb-28b19240e9d5&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114441 The Trial of William Garner - Death of a Farmer's Wife 1887 http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=6cafe83b-ef41-4628-a8ae-3562bcf03e9e&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114441 GARNER, Esther Hannah (I229)
 
136 Esther Southworth daughter of Michael Southworth and Esther Jepson SOUTHWORTH, Esther (I1116)
 
137 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1832 Date of Registration: Jan-Feb-Mar 1900 Age at Death: 68 Registration district: Blackburn Inferred County: Lancashire Volume: 8e Page: 402 HOLDEN, Sarah (I1906)
 
138 Extract from Bannister Grimshaw's The Entwisle Family "1812 - William Entwisle of Entwisle. Unto my son William one loom and all clothes. Unto my daughter Peggy one loom, and to my granddaughter Sally, the daughter of Robert Yates and Alice, daughter of Thomas Rawsthorne, one loom each if they do not leave my widow before the age of 21 years, or be married. All the rest and residue of my goods and chattels and effects to my wife Sally, unless she be married again, then to have but a child's share equally with my sons and daighters, and after her decease to be equally divided amongst my sons John, William, Ralph, and my daughters, Alice, wife of Thomas Marsden, Helen, wife of samuel Burty, and Peggy Entwisle." ENTWISLE, William (I1960)
 
139 Family memory that there was a coat of arms for this family. Family F636
 
140 Family memory that there was a coat of arms for this family. Nelson, Ellen (I2061)
 
141 Family story is that he was Freeman of Liverpool. Plaque in Liverpool ? St Nichoas' Church or on a monument?? Owned property in Pall Mall, Liverpool.
He does appear in 1832 Poll Book for Liverpool. 
ROUGHSEDGE, Thomas (I2321)
 
142 Family story is that Isabella's parents came from Scotland - just before Isabella's birth and that her father was marine engineer who died at sea of appendicitis before Isabella's birth.
According to census records 1851-71 the family were based in Liverpool during this period. Her Robertson grandparents had moved from Scotland around 1840. Her father Allan died at sea of apoplexy on the ship Bertha in November 1872. Recent information suggests he died off Port Said or off Aden and was buried at sea. He was chief engineer on another steamship - SS Virago.

Isabella was probably born 26 May 1872 in Conyers Street Everton, Liverpool but no registration of birth has been found yet. 
WYLIE, Isabella Allan (I2210)
 
143 Father Charles Fossett, mother named as Charlotte Fossett (formerly Smith) - but not married until 3 months later. FOSSETT, William (I6425)
 
144 Father's name is given as 'Edward' instead of 'Edmund' Entwisle. Mother is Mary Entwisle (formerly Marsden. Father signs with a X. ENTWISLE, William Henry (I1505)
 
145 Fell over chain fence by St George's Hall, Liverpool, banged head, developed meningitis and he died in 1900. BROWN, David (I2054)
 
146 Finally Janet married Richard Harrison using her defacto name "Maitland". Family F2140
 
147 For 'names of parents'
- for 'father' certificate states 'A home boy'
- for 'mother' it states 'not known' 
Family F2430
 
148 For the history of the regiments ?The 13th Battalion Royal Highlanders of Canada, 1914-1919? was published in 1925 and contains a detailed account of the battle where John lost his life, see http://tinyurl.com/m9n2svl WADDICOR, John William (I55)
 
149 Frail and shy, his poetry was often inspired by the countryside around Paisley. Despite having a deformity in his right leg, he would go for long walks in the Gleniffer Braes above the town. Poems such as "The Braes of Gleniffer" and "The Flower O' Levern Side" were about local haunts. He also wrote about soldiers and war as the loss of life during the Napoleonic Wars had an affect on him. TANNAHILL, Robert (I2952)
 
150 Friend's daughter is researching family tree of her partner, Craig Scully. Muriel is helping her. She found my reference to James Henry Starkie on Ancestry.
Record originated in... 
Source (S828)
 

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