B and E'sFamily
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Tree:  

Matches 101 to 150 of 982

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 20» Next»

   Notes   Linked to 
101 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
102 Ann was witness at the wedding of her sister Elizabeth (Holmes), widow of Samuel Holmes, to John Brown, a widower, in November 1852 Anne CALDWELL
 
103 8b p 227 Elizabeth CALDWELL
 
104 8b p 227 ? Elizabeth CALDWELL
 
105 Information gleaned by H. Hulme in 1943 for S.W. Caldwell from old Caldwell account books indicating that William's sister Ellen was a housekeeper for William and Sarah and that William
bought Ellen a pair of shoes in 1794. 
Ellen CALDWELL
 
106 Modified Register for William Caldwell - Notes from David Caldwell
David Caldwell [mailto:davidcaldwell@iprimus.com.au]


First Generation

1. William Caldwell 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 was born on 29 Sep 1766 in Kirkby. He was christened on 12 Oct 1766 in Kaye St Presbyterian Church, Liverpool. He died on 13 Nov 1844 in Knutsford. He was buried on 18 Nov 1844 in Old Dissenting Chapel, Nether Knutsford.

At the time of writing (20 Jan 2003) it is not possible to be precise about the first William Caldwell of
Knutsford's origins. There are a number of significant clues that are useful but not genealogically
conclusive.

These are:
1) His still existing gravestone at the Old Dissenting Chapel (the Unitarian Chapel), Brook Street,
Knutsford giving his date of burial as 1844.

2) His death certificate stating that he was 78 years old at the time of his death (ie 1766-1844).

3) An Oath of Administration signed by his son William Caldwell on 6th Jan 1845 that states his
actual death as 13 Nov 1844.

4) The 1841 census stating his age then as 70 but bearing in mind it was common practice with
censuses only to approximate age to the youngest possibility within a 5 year range. ie he was likely
to have been born between 1766 and 1771.

5) The 1841 census stating he was not born in Cheshire.

6) The 1851 census stating that his son William was born in Kirkby.

7)The Will of John Caldwell of Kirkby, leaseholder of land from the Earl of Sefton originally drawn up
on 15 Dec 1794 and proved in 1798 which bequeathed his son William the total of one shilling
whereas all other children were treated favourably. Maybe if this was the same family William was
not left any substantive inheritance because he had a business and a livelihood in Knutsford.

8) The will of Mary Caldwell, widow of Kirkby and also a leaseholder of land from the Earl of Sefton
proved in July 1803 which bequeathed money to the children of her son William whilst excluding
William. Mary Caldwell's other children were bequeathed direct legacies. The same logic as in the
above paragraph might have applied to William.

9) The family book of sermons printed in 1616 stating that the book was the property of William
Caldwell, born Michaelmas Day 1766, Nurseryman of Radshaw Nook which was located to the west
and slightly north of Knowsley Park and near Kirkby.

10) IGI individual record giving the christening of a William Caldwell at Kaye St Presbyterian Chapel
in Liverpool as 12 Oct 1766 ( shortly after Michaelmas Day which is 29 September). The fathers
name was John Caldwell. Kaye Street (aka Key St) was a chapel licenced as a meeting place for
protestant dissenters and opened on Nov 24th 1707.It closed in 1791. It later became St Matthews
Church and is now part of the railway station.

11)IGI individual record referring to christenings of children at Kirkby from 1788 to 1795 and then
from 1797 to 1807 at Knutsford where the parents were William Caldwell and Sarah in each case.


12)Information gleaned by H. Hulme in 1943 for S.W. Caldwell from old Caldwell account books
indicating that William's sister Ellen was a housekeeper for William and Sarah and that William
bought Ellen a pair of shoes in 1794. It also shows Thomas Caldwell working at Knutsford in 1794.
The St John Parish Records indicate that Thomas was a gardener and that he and his wife Mary
and their children in the period up to at least mid 1795 lived in Over Knutsford. After this time there
are no more records to indicate their ongoing presence in Knutsford. It seems likely that maybe this
Thomas Caldwell was related or connected to William in some way and it is possible that Thomas
was the same Thomas that William sold his stock to for one hundred pounds at Radshaw Nook. It
could well have been the case that as Thomas returned to Knowsley from Knutsford William at the
same time went from Knowsley to Knutsford! H. Hulme also gathered information out of Liverpool
directories showing that there was a John Caldwell who in 1793 was one of the Elders of the New
Scots Kirk, Liverpool. It would be interesting to determine whether the New Scots Kirk was the Kaye
St Presbyterian Church. H. Hulme also states that in this same year William Caldwell attended at
Liverpool to be sworn in as a Chapel Warden of Unitarian Chapel, Kirkby.

13)The surviving note written by William's son Thomas (died 1827) referring to the exact time and
date of his mother Sarah's death in 1825.

Although there is no as yet definitive proof it seems highly probable that the first William Caldwell
who came to Knutsford may have originally arrived to work for the existing nursery business of
Nickson and Carr as an apprentice in 1780 upon completion of his apprenticeship in 1787 he would
have then gone back to the Knowsley nursery until he was offered a permanent position in the
Knutsford nursery business in 1796. This is when he sold his stock in the Knowsley business to
Thomas Caldwell of Wavertree for one hundred pounds.

Joan Leach, Knutsford historian writes in The Knutsford Guardian dated Aug 29, 2001 that " before
the days of garden centres there was Caldwell's on Chelford Road where the Nurseries began
trading about 1760. William Caldwell was born on Michaelmas Day 1766, in Knowsley where his
father had a nursery business. He apprenticed his son to Nixon and Carr of Over Knutsford."
(* David Caldwell notes : there is an IGI individual record which has John Nickson marrying
Margaret Acton on 24 Nov 1758 at Knutsford).
Joan continues " perhaps Williams family had money to invest in the business for he soon became
partner and later sole owner, the first in a sequence of William Caldwells."
(* David Caldwell notes: John H. Harvey writes in his article 'Two Early Nurseries:Knowsley, Lancs
and Knutsford, Cheshire published in Vol 59, 1976 Journal of the Chester Archaelogical Society as
follows:
" In Cheshire the Knutsford Nursery is the earliest known and was founded or taken over about
1760 by John Nickson (died 1809). Described as ' of Over Knutsford, Gardener' on 27 Sep 1759,
when his son Joseph was baptised, John Nickson was probably the son of Joseph Nixon of Over
Knutsford, 'Gardiner', buried on 21 June 1755, and his wife Sarah, buried on 25 Sep 1759. Though
the gardens may have gone back to this earlier generation, no evidence has so far come to light.
The nursery was well established by 1784 when Baileys British directory lists John Nixon as
Botanist, Gardener and Seedsman. The firm had become (John) Nickson and (John) Carr by 1791,
when it began dealings with the smaller nursery at Radshaw Nook, Knowsley, run by William
Caldwell (1766-1844). Caldwell had been apprenticed to Nickson in 1780 at the age of 14 and after
serving his apprenticeship he returned to Kirkby. Contrary to the traditional belief that he married
Sarah Bradbury from Higher Town Farm it appears far more probable that he was the William
Caldwell that married Sarah Ashcroft at St James Church in Liverpool according to IGI data in 1787.
In 1793 J. Nickson & Carr, Nurserymen, Knutsford, Cheshire' subscribed to Richard Steele, An

Essay upon Gardening (York.G.Peacock), a useful work with lists of the various sorts of plants then
grown. In 1795 'Nixon & Carr, Nursery & Seedsmen' appeared in the entry for Knutsford in the
Universal British Directory. The next year Nickson retired and John Carr took into partnership
William Caldwell, who sold his stock in the Knowsley nursery to Thomas Caldwell of Wavertree for
100 pounds. Nickson after his retirement rented part of the Knutsford ground for 8 guineas a year.
he died in the spring of 1809, and his widow Margaret on 27 Jan 1823. Both were described in their
wills as of Nether Knutsford; presumably Nickson had moved his residence, perhaps on retirement,
away from the Nurseries, which were and are in Over Knutsford. Nickson was still of Over Knutsford
in 1775, and in 1793, when he was chosen as one of the two High Constables for the Hundred of
Bucklow as 'John Nickson of Over Knutsford, gent'. His account of expenses in serving the office
survives in the Nursery Cash Book. John Nickson left personal estate sworn at between 1500
pounds and 2000 pounds and owned the freehold of his house and garden in Nether Knutsford.
Some of this real estate had probably been realized during Margaret Nicksons widowhood, as her
personalty was put at 'under 3000 pounds.'
Joan Leach continues in her article " Accounts might be thought dull reading but William Caldwell's
reveal fascinating details of his life and business.
He bought a wig every three years and paid a Knutsford barber regularly to 'dress' it for him. He
brewed his own ale and wagered money at cock fighting on Knutsford racecourse. His sons
education cost him 29 pounds a year in the early 1800's boarding with the Rev. Jones at Great
Budworth. Caldwell's main expense was the rent for his nursery ground from Peter Legh of Booths
at 106 pounds, for example in 1791. Window tax cost him 38 shillings. Letters by carrier and toll bar
charges were steady outgoings."
In conclusion I think William was most likely the son of a John Caldwell. It becomes complicated
though because there appear to have been probably more than one John Caldwell and certainly
more than one William. Until proven otherwise I think William was born on Michaelmas Day 1766
and that his father was a John Caldwell.
The St John Parish records of Knutsford show the presence of a Thomas Caldwell (gardener) and
his wife Mary at Over Knutsford between 1792 and 1797. They had 4 children baptised at St Johns
Parish Church,Knutsford. These were John Caldwell born 7th May 1792 and baptised 24 May 1792;
Kitty born May 3rd 1794 and baptised May 6th 1794; William baptised 16 July 1795 and Mary born
12th Feb 1797 and baptised 19th Mar in 1797.This entire family disappears from all known records
showing their continued presence in Knutsford after Mar 19th 1797. It is quite possible that Thomas
and William were brothers. It may even be possible that this was the Thomas that William sold his
stock to for one hundred pounds and that Thomas eventually went back to run Radshaw Nook
Nursery.


William married Sarah Ashcroft 10 daughter of John Ashcroft on 31 Dec 1787 in St James Church, Liverpool, Lancashire. Sarah was born in 1762 in Kirkby, Lancashire. She was christened on 24 Aug 1762 in St Chad Kirkby by Melling. She died on 25 Apr 1825 in Over Knutsford, Cheshire. She was buried in Old Dissenting Chapel, Brook Street, Knutsford.

Nothing is known about Sarah Ashcroft other than the assumption that she is probably the Sarah
Ashcroft who was christened at St Chad Kirkby by Melling in 1762 and her father was John Ashcroft.
According to handwritten information in a book of sermons originally belonging to Thomas Caldwell
born 1802 his mother Sarah died at the age of 62 in 1825. This fits well and on balance it seems
probable that this is the wife of William Caldwell. According To Sarah Winifred Caldwell's history of
the family, tradition has it that William Caldwell married a Sarah Bradbury from Higher Town Farm in

Over Knutsford. The fact that she was born in 1763 making it possible for her to also be 62 in 1825
complicates things and lends substance to the possibility of this tradition being factual. However it
seems to me that when William Caldwell concluded his apprenticeship at Knutsford in 1787 and
then returned to Kirkby he would not have done that without marrying Sarah Bradbury in Knutsford.
There is no parish record to verify this marriage between Sarah Bradbury and William Caldwell.
There is however a Parish record showing that Sarah Bradbury married a William Berry in 1785 at
Knutsford St Johns Parish Church. They also had children christened at Knutsford ( Mary Berry chr
29 Jul 1787 and Martha Berry Chr 10 Apr 1796). It is likely that the Caldwell family in Kirkby had
known the Ashcroft family for some time given that they both are proven to have attended St Chad
Kirkby by Melling. 
William CALDWELL
 
107 She was attended by her grandson Allan Wyllie. Janet CARMICHAEL
 
108 Aunt Ellen Robertson left jewellery to Mary in will 1916 but Mary predeceased Ellen. Mary Eliza CATTERALL
 
109 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
110 Her death notice was published in the Liverpool Echo and is transcribed as follows:- October 24th 1975 in Hospital of 44 Sandyville Road, Liverpool 4, age 83 years. Edith May Murray beloved wife of the late Thomas Murray, loving mother of Tom, Winnie and Eileen (Deceased), also in-laws Molly, Jack and Tom. Cherished Nan of all her Grandchildren, and Great Grandchildren. Service and Cremation at Anfield Crematorium, Edith May COWEN
 
111 James Cowen and Ellen (nee Banks) Cowen
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=7308afa8-323d-42bc-b84a-661d15f70d29&tid=6779089&pid=-1227310432 
Ellen Ann COWEN
 
112 Warrington’s population in 1801 was some 11,000. Between the 1840s and 1880s, the town’s
population doubled to about 45,000 with the most rapid phase of growth occurring from the
1870s. By 1901 it had reached 65,000. The town’s good communications and expanding industries
attracted migrants especially from Ireland. The migrant families crowded into the small
terraced houses and courts typified by those shown around Buttermarket Street on the 1851 OS.
St. Mary’s R.C. Church of 1877 was symbolic of the cultural diversity and population growth then
affecting the town. 
Ellen Ann COWEN
 
113 Warrington’s population in 1801 was some 11,000. Between the 1840s and 1880s, the town’s population doubled to about 45,000 with the most rapid phase of growth occurring from the 1870s. By 1901 it had reached 65,000. The town’s good communications and expanding industries attracted igrants especially from Ireland. The migrant families crowded into the small terraced houses and courts typified by those shown around Buttermarket Street on the 1851 OS. St. Mary’s R.C. Church of 1877 was symbolic of the cultural diversity and population growth then affecting the town. Ellen Ann COWEN
 
114 This could be Emily - just described in index as 'female Cowen' aged 0.
Liverpool
vol 8b page 380 
Emily M COWEN
 
115 Q3 1868 Liverpool 8b page 29 Jane Banks COWEN
 
116 Unmarried Janet Carmichael COWEN
 
117 8b p302 'Jeanie Tannhill Cowen' Jeanie Tannahill COWEN
 
118 8b p439 'Jeanie Taunhill Cowen' Jeanie Tannahill COWEN
 
119 John Cowen, mariner of Bridgewater Street, aged 56. This could be Neil's father. Neil was married at this church 2 years later. John COWEN
 
120 West Derby
vol 8b, page 518 
Mary Elizabeth COWEN
 
121 West Derby vol 8b, page 374 Mary Elizabeth COWEN
 
122 Liverpool N. 10d p.214 Thomas Banks COWEN
 
123 West Derby Lancashire 8b p 510 Thomas Banks COWEN
 
124 TB Walter Henry COWEN
 
125 Lancashire Cricket Club arranged and paid for his funeral. John CROSSLAND
 
126 Sutton in Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, England
GRO Index: 1852 JUN Mansfield 7b 57 
John CROSSLAND
 
127 Mentioned in Will of father Betty DUXBURY
 
128 Mentioned in Will of father Catherine DUXBURY
 
129 Mentioned in Will of father Ellen DUXBURY
 
130 Living 1537 John DUXBURY
 
131 Mentioned in Will of father John DUXBURY
 
132 Mentioned in Will of father Oliver DUXBURY
 
133 Mentioned in Will of father Burials register records Simon Duxbury of Over Darwen, late of Wheelton Simon DUXBURY
 
134 Living 1525 Thomas DUXBURY
 
135 Mentioned in Will of father Thomas DUXBURY
 
136 Mentioned in Will of father William DUXBURY
 
137 Will dated 9th Nov 1756 Will dated 9th Nov 1756 William DUXBURY
 
138 Alice Ann Haslam Entwisle http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=237ea58f-5da6-406b-a7cf-762a4c71ef21&tid=4166381&pid=-1644114645 Alice Ann Haslam ENTWISLE
 
139 buried in grave 108 with father's siblings, Mary Ann and Thomas, who died in infancy. Grandparents Edmund and Mary Entwisle were later buried there also. Andrew ENTWISLE
 
140 Only record of this child was 1841 census. Maybe not the child of James and Ann? Ann ENTWISLE
 
141 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
142 Buried with Crook, Elizabeth Ellen 06 December 1919 Crook, Peter 05 September 1907 Catherine ENTWISLE
 
143 My father (William Henry Entwisle) used to describe his grandad Ned o'Bannister's funeral cortege. It needed 6 (I think) horses to pull the funeral carriage from Darwen up to Roman Road then over Wayho to Edgworth. Edmund ENTWISLE
 
144 Was this his daughter's home (Isabella Procter)? It was her address in 1919. Cause of death was carcinoma of parotid gland and exhaustion. Informant was son William Henry Entwistle, present at the death. Edmund ENTWISLE
 
145 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
146 Possibly died Q41874 Blackburn 8e p316 James ENTWISLE
 
147 Is this the older of the two Bill Entwisles who visited my dad the week he died (Mar 1975)? Lived in Meadow St/Portland st area - house with garden up steps. James William ENTWISLE
 
148 8th Border Regiment, 12909
Private John Entwistle of the 8th Border Regiment (No. 12909) was killed on 5th July 1916 at Aveluy Wood, during The Battle of Albert.
He was the son of Andrew Entwistle and Ellen (nee Ashworth). John was born on 31st July 1894 at 60 Cranberry Lane, Darwen. His mother died in 1904 and his father remarried the same year to Thirza Blandford. John attended Lower Chapel Sunday School, for whom he played cricket and football. He worked as a weaver at Mr T. D. Pickup?s mill in Marsh House Lane.
When war was declared he attested on 9th September 1914 at Darwen and he was posted to the 8th Border Regiment on the same day. He joined his Regiment at Carlisle. According to his army record, his height was given as 5ft 5½ins, weight 119lb, chest 32½ins (expansion 3ins), complexion fresh, eyes hazel, hair brown and his religion was Congregationalist. He had a scar in the middle of his forehead.
As soon as the Battalion was at strength they were deployed on training from 10th September 1914 to Codford at Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. On 16th September 1914, John was granted one week?s leave on account of his brother being ill. (This may have been George or Edmund.)
In early 1915, the Battalion moved to Aldershot for Brigade training. Here, the men learned the arts of soldiering in large formations. On completion of their training, it was time for the 8th Border Regiment to move for service overseas in the war zone. After a spell of leave at home they gathered at Codford Camp and prepared to travel to the Western Front.
They left Aldershot on the 25th September 1915, arriving in France on the 27th, at the Port of Boulogne. On arrival in France they travelled by train to Hazebrouck, marched to Strazeele and took lorries to Nieppe then marched on to Le Bizet where they were billeted. From here they went into the line at Ploegsteert for the first three months of "acclimatisation", as they learned the 'arts and tricks' of Trench Warfare under the guidance of the 48th Canadian Highlander Battalion.
Once they were trench ready they commenced trench warfare's cycles on front line, reserve line, rest and fatigues, as and when needed The Battalion started a period of turn and turnabout with the 10th Cheshire?s in line at East of Ploegsteert.
The nights of 4th to 9th October were full of sniping and machine gun fire from the enemy as the 8th Border tried to repair and reinforce the trenches in their sector. On the 9th they were relieved to billets at Ploeagsteert, exchanging places with the 10th Cheshire?s who went into line, in their place. The 10th -15th October was spent in the second line, doing fatigues and physical drills, followed by bathing. On the 15th October they went back into the front line to relieve the Cheshire?s again. The front line was as active as the first tour and the following gives a flavour of the action.
Poor weather was experienced during November and December 1915. Most of the Battalion activity concerned trench repairs and sniping duels. On a lighter note, one of the British snipers bagged a pheasant! Christmas this year was most definitely not a time for fraternisation and although the 8th Border were out of line and had Christmas Eve bath and a service on Christmas Day.
During the early part of 1916, the 8th Border were in training for the upcoming Offensive of the summer months, with which the British and French planned to break the German lines and win the war. Periods of training were alternated with periods in line and a gradual progression to be in the area of attack in time for the 'Big Push' (The Battle of the Somme). On 26th January 1916 the 8th Border, part of the 75th Brigade, 25th Division moved via La Creche, to Strazeele, where the men had Company Training. General Plumer and Lord Kitchener inspected the Brigade during route marches and some men attended a demonstration of the new German weapon, the Flammenwerfer.
On the 10th March 1916 they left Strazeele and moved to Nedon and Bryas for more training, all in preparation for the upcoming summer offensive. Sir Julian Byng inspected the men on 20th March 1916 and Sir Douglas Haig on the 31st, all while the men were on route marches. Things were beginning to ramp up now, as Wood Fighting in defence and attack, night fighting, bombing, training against the German Flammenwerfer and musketry and Lewis Gun firing was practised.
In early April, training continued for preparation to go in line north of Neuville St Vaast on the 21st April 1916. Whilst in line early during their stint, in the pouring rain and struggling to maintain the trenches, the Germans decided to test the 'new boys'. On 25th and 26th April 1916, the front line was subjected to a set of bombing raids which cost the lives of two men. May 1916 was spent in and out of line in the Neuville area and it was here the 8th Border got their first real taste of two notorious facets of Western Front warfare; mining and gas. On 4th May 1916 John was granted 8 days leave.
The 8th Border went out of line on the 20th May 1916, but they were harassed in Neuville by gas shells and heavy calibre shelling during the time in billets. They returned to the front line in late May and experienced a spate of casualties, due to mining, bombing and shelling as the enemy sought to make the area as uncomfortable for the troops as they could. Rumours of the build up to the ?Big Push? must have been rife on both sides of the line. June 1916 saw the Battalion moving towards the Somme Area, training and exercising as they went. The training was aimed at getting the men into a peak of battle readiness for the Battalion?s part in the Somme Offensive, set for the end of June or early July.
When the Battle of the Somme commenced, the 8th Battalion was stationed at Forceville, some four miles behind the front lines, but were ordered to be ready to move up at short notice, if events required. On the 2nd July 1916, they were marched to Martinsart Wood and the front lines south of Thiepval, to take part in an attack at 6 a.m. on July 3rd, in an area which had resisted attackers the previous day. With no attack taking place either side and severe enfilade fire from these flanks, the attack was costly to the 8th Border. The German trench was only captured for 200 yards in the centre of the attack and this was too badly damaged by shellfire to hold against counter attack. The men had to hold the line for another night as the battered 32nd Division who had attacked on the 1st July in this area, were in greater need of relief due to their higher casualties. The 8th Border were relieved on the night of the 4th July and bivouaced in Aveluy Wood as they and other Division battalions recovered from the failed attack. It was here that John lost his life but his body was never found.
John?s father received his son?s 1914-1915 Star on 19th September 1921 and the Victory & British War Medals 22nd September 1921.
John Entwistle has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing on the Somme Pier and Face 6 A 7 C. He is also remembered on the Lower Chapel war memorial.
 
John ENTWISLE
 
149 8th Border Regiment, 12909
Private John Entwistle of the 8th Border Regiment (No. 12909) was killed on 5th July 1916 at Aveluy Wood, during The Battle of Albert.
He was the son of Andrew Entwistle and Ellen (nee Ashworth). John was born on 31st July 1894 at 60 Cranberry Lane, Darwen. His mother died in 1904 and his father remarried the same year to Thirza Blandford. John attended Lower Chapel Sunday School, for whom he played cricket and football. He worked as a weaver at Mr T. D. Pickup?s mill in Marsh House Lane.
When war was declared he attested on 9th September 1914 at Darwen and he was posted to the 8th Border Regiment on the same day. He joined his Regiment at Carlisle. According to his army record, his height was given as 5ft 5½ins, weight 119lb, chest 32½ins (expansion 3ins), complexion fresh, eyes hazel, hair brown and his religion was Congregationalist. He had a scar in the middle of his forehead.
As soon as the Battalion was at strength they were deployed on training from 10th September 1914 to Codford at Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. On 16th September 1914, John was granted one week?s leave on account of his brother being ill. (This may have been George or Edmund.)
In early 1915, the Battalion moved to Aldershot for Brigade training. Here, the men learned the arts of soldiering in large formations. On completion of their training, it was time for the 8th Border Regiment to move for service overseas in the war zone. After a spell of leave at home they gathered at Codford Camp and prepared to travel to the Western Front.
They left Aldershot on the 25th September 1915, arriving in France on the 27th, at the Port of Boulogne. On arrival in France they travelled by train to Hazebrouck, marched to Strazeele and took lorries to Nieppe then marched on to Le Bizet where they were billeted. From here they went into the line at Ploegsteert for the first three months of "acclimatisation", as they learned the 'arts and tricks' of Trench Warfare under the guidance of the 48th Canadian Highlander Battalion.
Once they were trench ready they commenced trench warfare's cycles on front line, reserve line, rest and fatigues, as and when needed The Battalion started a period of turn and turnabout with the 10th Cheshire?s in line at East of Ploegsteert.
The nights of 4th to 9th October were full of sniping and machine gun fire from the enemy as the 8th Border tried to repair and reinforce the trenches in their sector. On the 9th they were relieved to billets at Ploeagsteert, exchanging places with the 10th Cheshire?s who went into line, in their place. The 10th -15th October was spent in the second line, doing fatigues and physical drills, followed by bathing. On the 15th October they went back into the front line to relieve the Cheshire?s again. The front line was as active as the first tour and the following gives a flavour of the action.
Poor weather was experienced during November and December 1915. Most of the Battalion activity concerned trench repairs and sniping duels. On a lighter note, one of the British snipers bagged a pheasant! Christmas this year was most definitely not a time for fraternisation and although the 8th Border were out of line and had Christmas Eve bath and a service on Christmas Day.
During the early part of 1916, the 8th Border were in training for the upcoming Offensive of the summer months, with which the British and French planned to break the German lines and win the war. Periods of training were alternated with periods in line and a gradual progression to be in the area of attack in time for the 'Big Push' (The Battle of the Somme). On 26th January 1916 the 8th Border, part of the 75th Brigade, 25th Division moved via La Creche, to Strazeele, where the men had Company Training. General Plumer and Lord Kitchener inspected the Brigade during route marches and some men attended a demonstration of the new German weapon, the Flammenwerfer.
On the 10th March 1916 they left Strazeele and moved to Nedon and Bryas for more training, all in preparation for the upcoming summer offensive. Sir Julian Byng inspected the men on 20th March 1916 and Sir Douglas Haig on the 31st, all while the men were on route marches. Things were beginning to ramp up now, as Wood Fighting in defence and attack, night fighting, bombing, training against the German Flammenwerfer and musketry and Lewis Gun firing was practised.
In early April, training continued for preparation to go in line north of Neuville St Vaast on the 21st April 1916. Whilst in line early during their stint, in the pouring rain and struggling to maintain the trenches, the Germans decided to test the 'new boys'. On 25th and 26th April 1916, the front line was subjected to a set of bombing raids which cost the lives of two men. May 1916 was spent in and out of line in the Neuville area and it was here the 8th Border got their first real taste of two notorious facets of Western Front warfare; mining and gas. On 4th May 1916 John was granted 8 days leave.
The 8th Border went out of line on the 20th May 1916, but they were harassed in Neuville by gas shells and heavy calibre shelling during the time in billets. They returned to the front line in late May and experienced a spate of casualties, due to mining, bombing and shelling as the enemy sought to make the area as uncomfortable for the troops as they could. Rumours of the build up to the ?Big Push? must have been rife on both sides of the line. June 1916 saw the Battalion moving towards the Somme Area, training and exercising as they went. The training was aimed at getting the men into a peak of battle readiness for the Battalion?s part in the Somme Offensive, set for the end of June or early July.
When the Battle of the Somme commenced, the 8th Battalion was stationed at Forceville, some four miles behind the front lines, but were ordered to be ready to move up at short notice, if events required. On the 2nd July 1916, they were marched to Martinsart Wood and the front lines south of Thiepval, to take part in an attack at 6 a.m. on July 3rd, in an area which had resisted attackers the previous day. With no attack taking place either side and severe enfilade fire from these flanks, the attack was costly to the 8th Border. The German trench was only captured for 200 yards in the centre of the attack and this was too badly damaged by shellfire to hold against counter attack. The men had to hold the line for another night as the battered 32nd Division who had attacked on the 1st July in this area, were in greater need of relief due to their higher casualties. The 8th Border were relieved on the night of the 4th July and bivouaced in Aveluy Wood as they and other Division battalions recovered from the failed attack. It was here that John lost his life but his body was never found.
John?s father received his son?s 1914-1915 Star on 19th September 1921 and the Victory & British War Medals 22nd September 1921.
John Entwistle has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing on the Somme Pier and Face 6 A 7 C. He is also remembered on the Lower Chapel war memorial.
 
John ENTWISLE
 
150 Attended Lower Chapel Sunday School. John ENTWISLE
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 20» Next»