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51 Baptism: 3 Sep 1843 St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England
William James Roughsedge - Child of Thomas Roughsedge & Mary
Abode: Norfolk St
Occupation: Wheelwright
Baptised by: Thos Halton, Curate
Register: Baptisms 1842 - 1843, Page 342, Entry 2736
Source: LDS Film 93884 
ROUGHSEDGE, William James (I2267)
 
52 Barnum Court? ROBERTSON, Ellen Ferguson (I2366)
 
53 before this date/ SIDDALL, Mary (I227)
 
54 Beneficiary of one third of great aunt Ellen's property according to 1916 will but replaced by Isabella and daughter Janet Cowen later. Also left £25. URE, Margaret (I2877)
 
55 Betty (17), daughter of James Entwistle, married James Entwistle (23), son of William Entwistle. Family F112
 
56 Blackburn 8e 796 Learned to read after his marriage - wife taught him to read newsprint Family F324
 
57 Blackley was originally owned by the Byron family, ancestors of the colourful romantic 19th century poet, Lord Byron. Linen weaving had been a cottage industry since the 16th century when French immigrants escaping religious persecution had settled in the area. Heaton Mills were built for the dyeing and printing of textiles close to the remains of a weir built to supply a water driven corn mill near Hollow Lane; and a print works was built around 1816 on the former site of Blackley Hall on Valentines Brow near Rochdale Road's junction with Middleton Road. The Hall was said to be haunted by the ghost of a murdered housekeeper and her little black dog and the print works never prospered. However, like Crumpsall, Blackley escaped the worst excesses of Cottonopolis until the early years of the 20th century when the demand for housing led to a gradual build up of suburbanisation. Blackley boasts a unique souvenir of Cottonopolis because the faƧade of Manchester's first Town Hall (which stood on King Street and was demolished in 1912) stands in the grounds of Heaton Hall on the edge of Blackley. SIDDALL, Mary (I227)
 
58 Blackley was originally owned by the Byron family, ancestors of the colourful romantic 19th century poet, Lord Byron. Linen weaving had been a cottage industry since the 16th century when French immigrants escaping religious persecution had settled in the area. Heaton Mills were built for the dyeing and printing of textiles close to the remains of a weir built to supply a water driven corn mill near Hollow Lane; and a print works was built around 1816 on the former site of Blackley Hall on Valentines Brow near Rochdale Road's junction with Middleton Road. The Hall was said to be haunted by the ghost of a murdered housekeeper and her little black dog and the print works never prospered. However, like Crumpsall, Blackley escaped the worst excesses of Cottonopolis until the early years of the 20th century when the demand for housing led to a gradual build up of suburbanisation. Blackley boasts a unique souvenir of Cottonopolis because the faƧade of Manchester's first Town Hall (which stood on King Street and was demolished in 1912) stands in the grounds of Heaton Hall on the edge of Blackley. HALL, Amos (I228)
 
59 bmiddleton1@tiscali.co.uk Source (S268)
 
60 Bombed out of his home in Walton, Liverpool 1940 app. URE, John Tannahill (I2882)
 
61 Born after his brother David drowned in canal so given his name. BROWN, David (I2049)
 
62 Both described as being 'of Garstang' on register. Witnesses were John Cross and Henry Lucas Family F773
 
63 both of the parish of Halsall
Witnesses: John Howard, John Bolton 
Family F1125
 
64 Both were living at 24 Sparrow Corner, close to the Tower of London.
Witnesses were Helen Smith and Thomas Kennett. This would be the Ellen Philp, Charlotte's sister, who later cared for her children Charlotte and Albert. 
Family F2142
 
65 Both were living at 24 Sparrow Corner, close to the Tower of London. Witnesses were Helen Smith and Thomas Kennett. This Helen would be the Ellen Philp, Charlotte's sister, who later cared for her children Charlotte and Albert. Family F2466
 
66 Both widowed. John lived at Beau Street, Elizabeth at Edgar Street, Liverpool at marriage. Witnesses were Joseph Sutton and Ann Caldwell Family F642
 
67 Boy born New Zealand 1865. Cousin of other Fossetts on this record. Oral records of Fossetts - quite a tribe of Fossetts emigrated by sailing ship, with most possessions, including donkey cart & 2 pet donkeys! Went to Christchurch and Dunedin. 2 sons went to Australia during goldrush.Some came back to England - possibly Henry & died of heart attack on London tram.
(Info. from Colin Parker) 
FOSSETT, Charles Portland (I6410)
 
68 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I315)
 
69 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I316)
 
70 Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire
vol 3b page 14 
TANNAHILL, Hugh (I2650)
 
71 Burial Lair Certificate 533 Compartment 6 Lairs 4914 and 4915. BLACKADDER, William (I3224)
 
72 Burial: 19 Aug 1782 St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England
William Robinson - son of James Robinson
Abode: Shaws Alley
Occupation: Smith
Register: Burials 1781 - 1784, Page 65, Entry 18
Source: LDS Film 93913 
Robinson, William (I5389)
 
73 Burial: 21 Mar 1790 Lower Chapel, Over Darwen, Lancashire, England Moses Whewel - Age: 78th Abode: Hattons Darwen Blackburn Lancashire Notes: Father of Edmd. Whewel Buried by: Robt. Smalley Register: Burials 1785 - 1819, Page 95, WHEWELL, Moses (I180)
 
74 Burial: 24 Feb 1802 St. Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Ann Robinson - wife of James Robinson
Age: 46 yrs
Abode: Shaws Alley
Occupation: Blacksmith
Register: Burials 1795 - 1804, Page 108, Entry 7
Source: LDS Film 93873
 
Bellis, Ann (I2127)
 
75 Burial: 7 Jan 1795 St. Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England
James Robinson - Son of James Robinson
Abode: Shaws Alley
Occupation: Black Smith
Register: Burials 1795 - 1804, Page 33, Entry 8
Source: LDS Film 93873 
Robinson, James (I5391)
 
76 buried in grave 108 with father's siblings, Mary Ann and Thomas, who died in infancy. Grandparents Edmund and Mary Entwisle were later buried there also. ENTWISLE, Andrew (I946)
 
77 Buried with Crook, Elizabeth Ellen 06 December 1919 Crook, Peter 05 September 1907 ENTWISLE, Catherine (I672)
 
78 buried with husband's Aunt Mary Bramwell (?) MUNDELL, Sarah (I373)
 
79 Cannot find census 1851 on Ancestry. Barbara MacPherson found it via another site. BANKS, Thomas (I2394)
 
80 Cause - cardiac failure. MATKIN, Joseph (I2602)
 
81 Cause - coronory thrombosis, arterio slerosis, chronic nephritis. ROBERTSON, Isabella Annie (I2502)
 
82 Cause - gastro entiritus ROBERTSON, Cyril (I2631)
 
83 Cause - marasmius. ROBERTSON, George (I2635)
 
84 Cause - meningitis MATKIN, Joseph Hugh (I2604)
 
85 Cause - multiple organ failure and pneumonia. ROBERTSON, Alexander (I2595)
 
86 Cause - respiratory arrest, pneumonia, cardiac failure. ROBERTSON, Stanley (I2636)
 
87 Cause of death acute bronchitis. ROGERS, Alice Mary (I2597)
 
88 Cause: disseminated sclerosis. Informant: William Gilchrist, son. Gilchrist, Samuel (I3331)
 
89 Cause: scarlet fever? ROBERTSON, Ethel Vera (I2601)
 
90 Charles David CROMPTON
211 BoodecroftStockbridge Village, Liverpool, Merseyside, L28 4EL, British Isles 
Source (S211)
 
91 Charles sent an email to John Shaw in NZ saying that he used to stay with Fred on his farm in Inverary.
Record originated in... 
Source (S710)
 
92 Charles Wright - Child of Charles Wright & Jeannie Born: 16 Aug 1896 Abode: 85 Alwyn Street Occupation: Book Keeper Baptised by: Geo. Fewster  
93 Charlotte died of acute bronchitis (5 days. Her son James had been born 5 days before her death. He himself died 2 weeks later. SMITH, Charlotte (I2561)
 
94 Charlotte, the mother, was described as a lodging house keeper. No father was named. Ellen Murray was present at the birth. Robertson, Charlotte Hollingham (I6428)
 
95 Chief bridesmaid was Margaret, Annie's sister. Little bridesmaid next to her could be youngest sister, Norah, then aged about 7. Family F398
 
96 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1503)
 
97 Claude (32) married Margaret Johnson (29) M. He was then a foreman iron moulder, described as a widower of 285 Crown St Glasgow. Margaret was a spinster, described as a china merchant of 174 Main St, Anderston, Glasgow. Witnesses were John Somerville and Margaret Stirk. Family F753
 
98 Clive Robertson's father (born 1935) remembered visiting his grandfather at Fernhead Road ROBERTSON, John Tannahill (I2889)
 
99 Commissioned 4 paintings from an artist in Naples when he was in port there. Irene Brightmer has 3, another is in Florida with grand daughter of Andrew Ure. URE, John Tannahill (I2882)
 
100 Copy of a letter from Mr. Thomas Tannahill (1762-1854) in Paisley to his relations in America. Thomas was writing to his aunts in USA - widows of uncles John and Robert who had emigrated in 1774.
Dated Paisley, 19th, May, 1824
Dear Aunts:
Your nephews on this side of the water are longing to hear from you. We would take it very kindly if you would correspond with us and let us know the situation of your families. Although our fathers are no more, we would not wish you to forget us their children. We will not trouble you with anything belonging to this country- but what we think will be more interesting to you, some particulars respecting our own families.
I am the only one of your nephews here that recollects our uncles. I assisted one or other of them at times as a draw boy. I have Uncle John's lamp which our father kept as long as he lived, it has stood in the same place, since our uncle went away which is about fifty years ago.
Our father died about two years ago aged near eighty seven years. He left two sons, two daughters with their families, with brother Robert's widow and family. Robert died about six years ago. Our uncle James died many years since. Our father and uncle James lived on the greatest friendship, they were respected by all who knew them while they lived, and were regretted when they died. I hope it was so with our uncles Robert and John. I remember they were like one another for the amiableness of their temper, and we are happy to say that our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were noted for their piety; which I hope will be said of their children for many generations.
The last account we heard of you was from Mr. Samuel Purden who came over about the end of the war. He informed us of the welfare of your families. He gave us some hopes that some of your sons would pay us a visit, which we would be very glad to realize.
With respect to my family I have three sons one of who is married in Glasgow very comfortable, has five children. Another is married in this town -has two children. Our youngest is at home with us. My wife and myself are on the decline of live, we cannot wait here.
You will see by our packet of letters how kindly we would take it if any of your would correspond with us. I will add no more but hope this will come safe to hand. I remain your loving nephew.
(signed) Thomas Tannahill 
TANNAHILL, Thomas (I2979)
 

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