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John ENTWISLE

Male 1894 - 1916  (21 years)


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  • Name John ENTWISLE  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Born 31 Jul 1894  60 Cranberry Lane, Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1901  Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Residence 1901  Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Residence 02 Apr 1911  181, Marsh House Lane,, Darwen, Lancashire, England/ Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Occupation 09 Sep 1914  Mr Pickup's Mill, Marsh House Lane, Darwen, Lancashire, , England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Weaver 
    Religion 09 Sep 1914  Congregational/DARWEN Lancashire England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Attended Lower Chapel Sunday School.
    Residence 09 Sep 1914  181 Marsh House Lane, Darwen, Lancashire, England/ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _MILT 09 Sep 1914  Recruited to 8th Bn Border Regt 12909/DARWEN Lancashire England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • 8th Border Regiment, 12909
      Private John Entwistle of the 8th Border Regiment (No. 12909) was killed on 5th July 1916 at Aveluy Wood, during The Battle of Albert.
      He was the son of Andrew Entwistle and Ellen (nee Ashworth). John was born on 31st July 1894 at 60 Cranberry Lane, Darwen. His mother died in 1904 and his father remarried the same year to Thirza Blandford. John attended Lower Chapel Sunday School, for whom he played cricket and football. He worked as a weaver at Mr T. D. Pickup?s mill in Marsh House Lane.
      When war was declared he attested on 9th September 1914 at Darwen and he was posted to the 8th Border Regiment on the same day. He joined his Regiment at Carlisle. According to his army record, his height was given as 5ft 5½ins, weight 119lb, chest 32½ins (expansion 3ins), complexion fresh, eyes hazel, hair brown and his religion was Congregationalist. He had a scar in the middle of his forehead.
      As soon as the Battalion was at strength they were deployed on training from 10th September 1914 to Codford at Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. On 16th September 1914, John was granted one week?s leave on account of his brother being ill. (This may have been George or Edmund.)
      In early 1915, the Battalion moved to Aldershot for Brigade training. Here, the men learned the arts of soldiering in large formations. On completion of their training, it was time for the 8th Border Regiment to move for service overseas in the war zone. After a spell of leave at home they gathered at Codford Camp and prepared to travel to the Western Front.
      They left Aldershot on the 25th September 1915, arriving in France on the 27th, at the Port of Boulogne. On arrival in France they travelled by train to Hazebrouck, marched to Strazeele and took lorries to Nieppe then marched on to Le Bizet where they were billeted. From here they went into the line at Ploegsteert for the first three months of "acclimatisation", as they learned the 'arts and tricks' of Trench Warfare under the guidance of the 48th Canadian Highlander Battalion.
      Once they were trench ready they commenced trench warfare's cycles on front line, reserve line, rest and fatigues, as and when needed The Battalion started a period of turn and turnabout with the 10th Cheshire?s in line at East of Ploegsteert.
      The nights of 4th to 9th October were full of sniping and machine gun fire from the enemy as the 8th Border tried to repair and reinforce the trenches in their sector. On the 9th they were relieved to billets at Ploeagsteert, exchanging places with the 10th Cheshire?s who went into line, in their place. The 10th -15th October was spent in the second line, doing fatigues and physical drills, followed by bathing. On the 15th October they went back into the front line to relieve the Cheshire?s again. The front line was as active as the first tour and the following gives a flavour of the action.
      Poor weather was experienced during November and December 1915. Most of the Battalion activity concerned trench repairs and sniping duels. On a lighter note, one of the British snipers bagged a pheasant! Christmas this year was most definitely not a time for fraternisation and although the 8th Border were out of line and had Christmas Eve bath and a service on Christmas Day.
      During the early part of 1916, the 8th Border were in training for the upcoming Offensive of the summer months, with which the British and French planned to break the German lines and win the war. Periods of training were alternated with periods in line and a gradual progression to be in the area of attack in time for the 'Big Push' (The Battle of the Somme). On 26th January 1916 the 8th Border, part of the 75th Brigade, 25th Division moved via La Creche, to Strazeele, where the men had Company Training. General Plumer and Lord Kitchener inspected the Brigade during route marches and some men attended a demonstration of the new German weapon, the Flammenwerfer.
      On the 10th March 1916 they left Strazeele and moved to Nedon and Bryas for more training, all in preparation for the upcoming summer offensive. Sir Julian Byng inspected the men on 20th March 1916 and Sir Douglas Haig on the 31st, all while the men were on route marches. Things were beginning to ramp up now, as Wood Fighting in defence and attack, night fighting, bombing, training against the German Flammenwerfer and musketry and Lewis Gun firing was practised.
      In early April, training continued for preparation to go in line north of Neuville St Vaast on the 21st April 1916. Whilst in line early during their stint, in the pouring rain and struggling to maintain the trenches, the Germans decided to test the 'new boys'. On 25th and 26th April 1916, the front line was subjected to a set of bombing raids which cost the lives of two men. May 1916 was spent in and out of line in the Neuville area and it was here the 8th Border got their first real taste of two notorious facets of Western Front warfare; mining and gas. On 4th May 1916 John was granted 8 days leave.
      The 8th Border went out of line on the 20th May 1916, but they were harassed in Neuville by gas shells and heavy calibre shelling during the time in billets. They returned to the front line in late May and experienced a spate of casualties, due to mining, bombing and shelling as the enemy sought to make the area as uncomfortable for the troops as they could. Rumours of the build up to the ?Big Push? must have been rife on both sides of the line. June 1916 saw the Battalion moving towards the Somme Area, training and exercising as they went. The training was aimed at getting the men into a peak of battle readiness for the Battalion?s part in the Somme Offensive, set for the end of June or early July.
      When the Battle of the Somme commenced, the 8th Battalion was stationed at Forceville, some four miles behind the front lines, but were ordered to be ready to move up at short notice, if events required. On the 2nd July 1916, they were marched to Martinsart Wood and the front lines south of Thiepval, to take part in an attack at 6 a.m. on July 3rd, in an area which had resisted attackers the previous day. With no attack taking place either side and severe enfilade fire from these flanks, the attack was costly to the 8th Border. The German trench was only captured for 200 yards in the centre of the attack and this was too badly damaged by shellfire to hold against counter attack. The men had to hold the line for another night as the battered 32nd Division who had attacked on the 1st July in this area, were in greater need of relief due to their higher casualties. The 8th Border were relieved on the night of the 4th July and bivouaced in Aveluy Wood as they and other Division battalions recovered from the failed attack. It was here that John lost his life but his body was never found.
      John?s father received his son?s 1914-1915 Star on 19th September 1921 and the Victory & British War Medals 22nd September 1921.
      John Entwistle has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing on the Somme Pier and Face 6 A 7 C. He is also remembered on the Lower Chapel war memorial.
    _MILT 16 Sep 1914  Given a week's leave on account of two of his brothers being ill./Darwen, Lancashire, , England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _MILT 06 Sep 1915  Posted to France/France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 05 Jul 1916  Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France. Panel number: Pier and Face 6 A and 7 C./Somme, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 5
    Probate 31 Oct 1916  Entwisle John of 181 Marsh house-lane Darwen Lancashire weaver died on or about the 3 July 1916 in France killed in action. Probate Lancaster 31 October to John Edwin Entwisle retired collier. Effects £30 16s 10d. (John Edwin was his uncle.)/Lancaster, Lancashire,England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    John Entwisle probate Oct 1916
    John Entwisle probate Oct 1916
    Notes 
    • 8th Border Regiment, 12909
      Private John Entwistle of the 8th Border Regiment (No. 12909) was killed on 5th July 1916 at Aveluy Wood, during The Battle of Albert.
      He was the son of Andrew Entwistle and Ellen (nee Ashworth). John was born on 31st July 1894 at 60 Cranberry Lane, Darwen. His mother died in 1904 and his father remarried the same year to Thirza Blandford. John attended Lower Chapel Sunday School, for whom he played cricket and football. He worked as a weaver at Mr T. D. Pickup?s mill in Marsh House Lane.
      When war was declared he attested on 9th September 1914 at Darwen and he was posted to the 8th Border Regiment on the same day. He joined his Regiment at Carlisle. According to his army record, his height was given as 5ft 5½ins, weight 119lb, chest 32½ins (expansion 3ins), complexion fresh, eyes hazel, hair brown and his religion was Congregationalist. He had a scar in the middle of his forehead.
      As soon as the Battalion was at strength they were deployed on training from 10th September 1914 to Codford at Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. On 16th September 1914, John was granted one week?s leave on account of his brother being ill. (This may have been George or Edmund.)
      In early 1915, the Battalion moved to Aldershot for Brigade training. Here, the men learned the arts of soldiering in large formations. On completion of their training, it was time for the 8th Border Regiment to move for service overseas in the war zone. After a spell of leave at home they gathered at Codford Camp and prepared to travel to the Western Front.
      They left Aldershot on the 25th September 1915, arriving in France on the 27th, at the Port of Boulogne. On arrival in France they travelled by train to Hazebrouck, marched to Strazeele and took lorries to Nieppe then marched on to Le Bizet where they were billeted. From here they went into the line at Ploegsteert for the first three months of "acclimatisation", as they learned the 'arts and tricks' of Trench Warfare under the guidance of the 48th Canadian Highlander Battalion.
      Once they were trench ready they commenced trench warfare's cycles on front line, reserve line, rest and fatigues, as and when needed The Battalion started a period of turn and turnabout with the 10th Cheshire?s in line at East of Ploegsteert.
      The nights of 4th to 9th October were full of sniping and machine gun fire from the enemy as the 8th Border tried to repair and reinforce the trenches in their sector. On the 9th they were relieved to billets at Ploeagsteert, exchanging places with the 10th Cheshire?s who went into line, in their place. The 10th -15th October was spent in the second line, doing fatigues and physical drills, followed by bathing. On the 15th October they went back into the front line to relieve the Cheshire?s again. The front line was as active as the first tour and the following gives a flavour of the action.
      Poor weather was experienced during November and December 1915. Most of the Battalion activity concerned trench repairs and sniping duels. On a lighter note, one of the British snipers bagged a pheasant! Christmas this year was most definitely not a time for fraternisation and although the 8th Border were out of line and had Christmas Eve bath and a service on Christmas Day.
      During the early part of 1916, the 8th Border were in training for the upcoming Offensive of the summer months, with which the British and French planned to break the German lines and win the war. Periods of training were alternated with periods in line and a gradual progression to be in the area of attack in time for the 'Big Push' (The Battle of the Somme). On 26th January 1916 the 8th Border, part of the 75th Brigade, 25th Division moved via La Creche, to Strazeele, where the men had Company Training. General Plumer and Lord Kitchener inspected the Brigade during route marches and some men attended a demonstration of the new German weapon, the Flammenwerfer.
      On the 10th March 1916 they left Strazeele and moved to Nedon and Bryas for more training, all in preparation for the upcoming summer offensive. Sir Julian Byng inspected the men on 20th March 1916 and Sir Douglas Haig on the 31st, all while the men were on route marches. Things were beginning to ramp up now, as Wood Fighting in defence and attack, night fighting, bombing, training against the German Flammenwerfer and musketry and Lewis Gun firing was practised.
      In early April, training continued for preparation to go in line north of Neuville St Vaast on the 21st April 1916. Whilst in line early during their stint, in the pouring rain and struggling to maintain the trenches, the Germans decided to test the 'new boys'. On 25th and 26th April 1916, the front line was subjected to a set of bombing raids which cost the lives of two men. May 1916 was spent in and out of line in the Neuville area and it was here the 8th Border got their first real taste of two notorious facets of Western Front warfare; mining and gas. On 4th May 1916 John was granted 8 days leave.
      The 8th Border went out of line on the 20th May 1916, but they were harassed in Neuville by gas shells and heavy calibre shelling during the time in billets. They returned to the front line in late May and experienced a spate of casualties, due to mining, bombing and shelling as the enemy sought to make the area as uncomfortable for the troops as they could. Rumours of the build up to the ?Big Push? must have been rife on both sides of the line. June 1916 saw the Battalion moving towards the Somme Area, training and exercising as they went. The training was aimed at getting the men into a peak of battle readiness for the Battalion?s part in the Somme Offensive, set for the end of June or early July.
      When the Battle of the Somme commenced, the 8th Battalion was stationed at Forceville, some four miles behind the front lines, but were ordered to be ready to move up at short notice, if events required. On the 2nd July 1916, they were marched to Martinsart Wood and the front lines south of Thiepval, to take part in an attack at 6 a.m. on July 3rd, in an area which had resisted attackers the previous day. With no attack taking place either side and severe enfilade fire from these flanks, the attack was costly to the 8th Border. The German trench was only captured for 200 yards in the centre of the attack and this was too badly damaged by shellfire to hold against counter attack. The men had to hold the line for another night as the battered 32nd Division who had attacked on the 1st July in this area, were in greater need of relief due to their higher casualties. The 8th Border were relieved on the night of the 4th July and bivouaced in Aveluy Wood as they and other Division battalions recovered from the failed attack. It was here that John lost his life but his body was never found.
      John?s father received his son?s 1914-1915 Star on 19th September 1921 and the Victory & British War Medals 22nd September 1921.
      John Entwistle has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing on the Somme Pier and Face 6 A 7 C. He is also remembered on the Lower Chapel war memorial.
    Person ID I2192  Eileen's Family Tree
    Last Modified 1 Jul 2016 

    Father Andrew ENTWISLE,   b. 06 Apr 1863, Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jul 1944, Marsh House Lane, Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Mother Ellen ASHWORTH,   b. Mar 1866, Drummer Stoops, Over Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1904, Blackburn, Lancashire, , England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 37 years) 
    Married 26 May 1888  St John's Church, Darwen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Family ID F142  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    John Entwisle probate Oct 1916
    John Entwisle probate Oct 1916

  • Sources 
    1. [S365] England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.Original data - Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. Londo;).
      Death date: 3 Jul 1916
      Death place: Lancashire, England

    2. [S47] British Army WWI Service Records, 1914-1920, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008.Original data - War Office: Soldiers’ Documents, First World War ‘Burnt Documents’ (Microfilm Copies); (The National Archives Microfilm Publication WO363); Records created or inherite;).
      Birth date: abt 1894
      Birth place: Darwen, Lancashire, England

    3. [S376] 1911 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England.;).
      Birth date: abt 1895
      Birth place: Darwen, Lancashire, England
      Residence date: 02 Apr 1911
      Residence place: Darwen, Lancashire, England

    4. [S46] British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008.Original data - Army Medal Office. WWI Medal Index Cards. In the care of The Western Front Association website.Original data: Army Medal Office. WWI Medal Index Cards. In the care of;).
      Residence date:
      Residence place: England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland

    5. [S43] UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, Military-Genealogy.com, comp, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008.Original data - British and Irish Military Databases. The Naval and Military Press Ltd.Original data: British and Irish Military Databases. The Naval and Military Press Ltd.;).
      Birth date:
      Birth place: Darwen, Lancs, England
      Death date: 5 Jul 1916
      Death place: France & Flanders
      Residence date:
      Residence place: Darwen

    6. [S68] 1901 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1901. Data imaged from the National;), Class: RG13; Piece: 3924; Folio: 112; Page: 25.
      Birth date: abt 1895
      Birth place: Darwen, Lancashire, England
      Residence date: 1901
      Residence place: Darwen, Lancashire, England

    7. [S348] 1901 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1901. Data imaged from the National;).

    8. [S47] British Army WWI Service Records, 1914-1920, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008.Original data - War Office: Soldiers’ Documents, First World War ‘Burnt Documents’ (Microfilm Copies); (The National Archives Microfilm Publication WO363); Records created or inherite;).

    9. [S48] England & Wales Marriages, 1538-1940, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008.Original data - Genealogical Society of Utah. British Isles Vital Records Index, 2nd Edition. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectual Reserve, copyright 2002. Used by permission.Original d;).
      Birth date: abt 1867
      Birth place:
      Marriage date: 26 May 1888
      Marriage place: Over Darwen, Lancashire, England
      Residence date:
      Residence place: England